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Q. What are the mine’s current and approved levels of production?

The Chain Valley Colliery has historically produced between 450,000 and 1,100,000 tonnes per annum (tpa) with the variability governed by several factors including demand and mining conditions (geology etc).  The Project Approval permits a maximum output of 1,200,000 tpa. The Transport Report and all other sections of the Environmental Assessment (EA) have been developed using the 1,200,000 tpa figure to assess the maximum potential impact from this level of production.

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Q. Where is the coal from Chain Valley Colliery sent?

The EA has assumed that in an average year, product coal sales are distributed approximately as follows – 55% to export through Port Waratah, 30% to Vales Point Power Station and the remaining 15% split between smaller local customers. Please note that the distribution split varies  (sometimes significantly) and this variation is expected  to continue in the future.

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Q. What are the total current and projected truck movements?

Total truck movements (out loaded and back empty = two movements) along Ruttleys Road at the approved output level of 1.2Mtpa (million tonnes per annum) are estimated at 270 average movements per day. Given that the coal is moved on an intermittent basis, to satisfy shipping schedules and customer requirements, a maximum number of 270 loads or 540 movements would occur in any day. Currently laden coal trucks must leave the mine between 5.30am and 5.30pm (12 hours) Monday to Friday, and not at all on public holidays.

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Q. Will seagrass be protected?

Although LakeCoal cannot guarantee the protection of seagrasses in the lease area due to the complex interaction of industries and users around the Lake and potential unknown challenges including climate change – a subsidence exclusion barrier, known as the seagrass protection barrier – designed to prevent subsidence impacts from damaging seagrasses or reducing suitable seagrass habitat has been implemented. The seagrass protection barrier (pdf file) is established based on mapped seagrass locations and utilises a 26.5 degree angle of draw from these areas to provide a limit of the secondary extraction for the mine workings, which are reflected in the full extraction area on this plan (pdf file).

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Q. Will the foreshore be impacted?

A high water mark subsidence barrier is in place to protect the foreshore, a figure depicting how this barrier is determined is located here (pdf file). Accordingly all secondary extraction is undertaken outside this barrier to protect the foreshore.

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Q. Where are the mining areas?

LakeCoal holds a large area of mining tenements that includes areas of Gwandalan, Summerland Point and Chain Valley Bay along with areas under Lake Macquarie. Currently all secondary extraction is being undertaken beneath Lake Macquarie in accordance with the Project Approval.

Details of proposed future mining activities will be made available on the website, on the Project Applications and Modifications page and/or the NSW Department of Planning and Infrastructure website.

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Q. How can I apply for a job at Chain Valley Colliery?

Employment opportunities will be advertised in local media and online when recruitment is occurring. If you would like to check if recruitment is occurring, phone the main office on (02) 4358 0800. LDO also has current position vacant listed on its website – http://www.ldo.com.au.

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Q. How is the community kept informed about the Chain Valley Colliery?

LakeCoal has a firm commitment to engage with the community and other stakeholders to keep them informed regarding the Chain Valley Colliery. The main communication channels for the community are through the consultative committee and the community hotline (1800 687 557). This website will also be frequently updated to include,  amongst other information, relevant environmental monitoring results, approvals, management plans and audit results.

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Q. How is coal transported from the mine?

Product coal is transported by truck to the PWCS Carrington Coal Terminal and to domestic customers, including the neighbouring Vales Point Power Station.

Recently, LakeCoal in consultation with Delta Electricity have changed the truck haulage route to Vales Point Power Station, enabling all haulage to the power station to occur via private roads. As a result, trucks travelling to and from Vales Point Power Station no longer routinely utilise public roads as part of the transport route. Trucks would only use public roads to transport coal to Vales Point Power Station for limited periods in the event that private roads are unavailable, however such use would also be subject to the approval of the Director-General.

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